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Residential

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Ojai Home Popup

Ojai Home

A rustic retreat near the village of Ojai, featuring modern fixtures and amenities, with a beautiful handcrafted woodwork throughout.

Beach House 1

Beach House 1

This floor plan for this ocean-front residence is open and simple, with an arched conversation room projecting toward the sea like the prow of a ship. 

Beach House 2

Beach House 2

A complete ocean-side makeover: We replaced the dark, dated interior with light walls, glass block and bright, radiant spaces. 

Beach House 3

Vacation Home

This beach front residence remodel project preserved the original foundations and chimney.  The site is a quaint setting with trees from the 1940’s.  The exterior architecture is a type of Cape Cod cedar.

Commercial

The Firehouse: Patagonia

Patagonia Headquarters

We welded the spirit of the original firehouse that stood on this location  to today’s technology and  environmental considerations.

Solar Panels

Solar Panel Carport

This sustainable energy project incorporates 360 Sharp solar panels rated at 185 watts, for a total ou8tput of 66.6 kW.   

Patagonia Retail: Ventura

Patagonia: Ventura

We completely remodeled the Great Pacific Iron Works building, the very first Patagonia retail location.  

Patagonia Retail: Santa Monica

Patagonia: Santa Monica

Our collaboration with Patagonia resulted a retail destination framed by vaulted ceilings,  filled with abundant natural light, and characterized by brick, wood and other natural materials. 

Wine Retailer

Wine Retailer

The wine store and boutique is the vision of owner Seana Weaver. The building itself is from the 1920’s, and the view of its vintage roof and ceiling add flavor to the rich new fixtures.

Pool Facility

Pool Facility

We  installed a microturbine to power and heat two pools and pool building, resulting 80% energy efficiency for the entire facility. 

Cate School Daycare Center

Cate School Daycare Center

This Daycare Center is one of dozens of projects we’ve developed over the years for The Cate School. LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified for energy efficiency.

Pool Facility

Cate School Residences

These Faculty Residences consist of five 2,400 s.f. +/- LEED Platinum homes, constructed to the highest standards of energy efficiency and sustainability. 

Wastewater Treatment Plant

Wastewater Treatment Plant

Copy to come 

Bioswale

Cate School Bioswale

The Cate bioswales were designed to enhance the campus’ natural beauty, while slowing and cleaning runoff water during rain events. 

Ampitheatre

Cate School Ampitheatre

Produce Processing Plant

Produce Processing Plant

 

Advanced Energy Recovery System

Energy Recovery System

The Advanced Energy Recovery System system juices the onions produce more than 100 standard cubic feet per minute of biogas. 

Processing/Engine Room

Processing/Engine Room

Contact Hartigan/Foley

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Contact Hartigan/Foley

 

Please let us know about the services you're interested in.

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  • This Ojai retreat is actually an alternative great room and patio for the main residence. Using the 800 square-foot maximum allowance, the structure allows for highly efficient cooling on Ojai’s famously hot summer days. It’s location, with views of the riverbed and swimming pool, invites the residents to enjoy a private vacation each evening.

  • This ocean-front residence is built on foundation cantilevers over 20- 20 foot-deep caissons. The floor plan is open and simple, with an arched conversation room projecting toward the sea like the prow of a ship. Exterior acrylic plaster and vinyl sashes minimize the cladding and maintenance, while low-E tinted glass keep a balanced interior with constant circulation fan systems and radiant floor heating. Detailed execution of the stone fireplace and carved mangle highlight the owner’s individual choices that give this home a distinctive style.

  • This ocean-front home is a major remodel of an older wood-exterior house.  The floor plan provides framed views of the islands to the west and the Ventura river mouth to the northeast.  The dark interior has been replaced with light walls and glass block inserts, while keeping the redwood ceiling.  The western exposure and multiple furrows allow for cool and warm sitting areas to fit one’s taste.  The exterior and interior surfaces are selected for easy cleaning and low maintenance in a setting of sand and salt air.

  • This beach front residence was a remodel project, keeping on the original foundations and chimney.  The site is a quaint setting with trees from the 1940’s.  The exterior architecture is a type of Cape Cod cedar. Particular care was taken with flashing, sealing and extensive prep work/ painting to withstand the marine environment.  The interior split-level and elliptical living areas create individual environments to enjoy the home with the ocean always part of the experience.

  • Ventura CA’s Firehouse building is one of several Patagonia projects developed by Hartigan/Foley. A turn-of-the-century fire station once stood at the corner of California and Santa Clara streets. The Firehouse, which Patagonia uses for offices and meetings, is a unique reincarnation of that building. In constructing this new model, we stayed as true to the original as possible, with necessary bows to function, cost, modern aesthetic sensibilities, and most importantly, environmental considerations. The structure that occupied the site where the Firehouse now stands was carefully dismantled, shipped and then reconstructed in its entirety on the Oglala-Sioux Reservation in South Dakota. Usually, demolished buildings end up as waste in a landfill. We recycled almost 100% of the waste generated during the construction process. None of the building materials ended up in a landfill. The framework used in the Firehouse is made with at least 98.5% recycled steel. fills.

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    Hartigan/Foley completed the design and installation of a large solar photovoltaic carport project at Patagonia’s Ventura, California headquarters. The system incorporates 360 Sharp solar panels rated at 185-watts for a combined output of 66.6 kW. The panels are on three custom-built carports erected in the parking lot. The eye-catching structure produces an amount of energy equivalent to the energy used in approximately 60 California homes during peak usage periods and also shades cars during the day. “Our new solar system proves energy independence can be aesthetically pleasing,” said Jill Dumain, Patagonia. “Patagonia believes in using business to inspire solutions to the environmental crisis, and our solar solution is just one example of our commitment to that belief.”

  • Great Pacific Iron Works was Patagonia’s very first store. It’s a beautifully remodeled building from the ‘20s that carries a wide assortment of  Patagonia outdoor clothing and gear. The location is also home to community events, weekly yoga classes.

  • The wine store and boutique is the vision of owner Seana Weaver, who designed all the shapes, colors, and surfaces.  The building itself is from the 1920’s, and the view of its vintage roof and ceiling add flavor to the rich new fixtures. The near beach cool environment is maintained by the old brick walls, the stained concrete floor, and solar-powered roof-mounted exhaust fans.

  • This private school’s LEED pool facility consists of a 3,799 s.f. building and two pools; a recreation and competition pool. In lieu of receiving energy to power the building and heat the pools from the grid, a microturbine was installed. This microturbine allows the entire facility to be 80%+ energy efficient versus 30% efficient through CHP cogeneration. The microturbine saves the private school $46,000 + annually on heating for the pools, and provides 100% of the pool complex’s electrical needs along with 33% of the campus electrical needs. The building was constructed with 90% FSC lumber, formaldehyde-free insulation, zero-VOC paint, and LED lights throughout. The lockers and benches for the locker rooms were constructed from 50% recycled plastic. The landscaping was created using native, drought-tolerant plants. Ninety five percent of all construction waste was diverted from the Tajiguas landfill.

  • This private school’s Faculty Residences consist of five 2,400 s.f. +/- LEED Platinum homes. These buildings were constructed with 90% FSC lumber, bamboo flooring, 55% recycled content tile in the kitchen and bathrooms, 90% recycled content carpet, 25% recycled content-formaldehyde- free insulation, zero-VOC paint, and LED lights throughout. Radon mats were installed to reduce exposure to this naturally occurring toxic gas. Solar panels on each of the homes provide an excess amount of energy needed for that home. The landscaping was created using native, drought- tolerant plants. Eighty eight percent of all construction waste was diverted from the Tajiguas landfill.

  • This private school’s Faculty Residences consist of five 2,400 s.f. +/- LEED Platinum homes. These buildings were constructed with 90% FSC lumber, bamboo flooring, 55% recycled content tile in the kitchen and bathrooms, 90% recycled content carpet, 25% recycled content-formaldehyde- free insulation, zero-VOC paint, and LED lights throughout. Radon mats were installed to reduce exposure to this naturally occurring toxic gas. Solar panels on each of the homes provide an excess amount of energy needed for that home. The landscaping was created using native, drought- tolerant plants. Eighty eight percent of all construction waste was diverted from the Tajiguas landfill.

  • The purposes and benefits of the bioswale are many and varied. The Cate bioswales were designed to enhance the campus’ natural beauty, while slowing and cleaning runoff water during rain events. The sandstone boulders found on campus were used throughout construction. They were arranged to form streams through the campus, punctuated by pools to hold the water, allowing percolation and evaporation. Bioswales are landscape elements designed to remove silt and pollution from surface runoff water. They consist of a swaled drainage course with gently sloped sides (less than six percent) and filled with vegetation, compost and/or riprap. The water’s flow path, along with the wide and shallow ditch, is designed to maximize the time water spends in the swale, which aids the trapping of pollutants and silt. Depending upon the geometry of land available, a bioswale may have a meandering or almost straight channel alignment. Biological factors also contribute to the breakdown of certain pollutants. A common application is around parking lots, where substantial automotive pollution is collected by the paving and then flushed by rain. The bioswale, or other type of biofilter, wraps around the parking lot and treats the runoff before releasing it to the watershed or storm sewer. There are several classes of water pollutants that may be arrested with bioswales. These fall into the categories of silt, inorganic contaminants, organic chemicals and pathogens. In the case of silt, these effects are resultant turbidity to receiving waters. Inorganic compounds may be metallic compounds such as lead, chromium, cadmium and other heavy metals. Lead is the most prevalent chemical of this class, deriving from automotive residue (e.g. surface spillage of leaded gasoline). Other common inorganic compounds are macronutrients such as phosphates and nitrates. Principal sources of these nutrients are excess fertilization, which can cause eutrophication in receiving waters. Chief organic chemicals are pesticides, frequently over-dosed in agricultural and urban landscaping. These chemicals can lead to a variety of organism poisoning and aquatic ecosystem disturbance. Pathogens typically derive from surface runoff containing animal wastes and
    can lead to a variety of diseases in humans and aquatic organisms.

  • This project was for the largest onion processor in the United States, a family owned business operating for more than 20 years. Each day this facility peels and cuts 1 million pounds of onions.  This processing generates hundreds of thousands of onion waste daily that up until recently was disposed of by hauling and tiling into soil at a cost of $400,000 per year.  The Advanced Energy Recovery System (AERS) system juices the onions to utilize the juice in an anaerobic digester to produce methane gas.  The leftover fiber material, called cake, is now an acceptable product to be sold as cattle feed.  The anaerobic digester produces more than 100 standard cubic feet per minute of biogas.  The biogas is then dewatered, purified, compressed, and dried to be an acceptable fuel for the installed fuel cells.  The fuel cells use a blend of 80% biogas and 20% natural gas to produce electricity by a non-burning ultra clean emission process that has an operating efficiency 1.5 times that of typical combustion engine power generators.  The fuel cells produce 600kw of electricity (enough for over 150 homes).  The generated power covers 38-40% of the onion plants electrical needs.  This is an excellent award-winning example of a waste-to-energy project.